Recent Scholarship: Islam and Irish Law

A new book published last month by Brill, Minority Religions under Irish Law: Islam in National and International Context, edited by Kathryn O’Sullivan (University of Limerick), examines how minority religions in general – and Islam in particular – fit into the legal and policy context in Ireland. The chapters address high-profile issues such as marriage … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Islam and Irish Law

Recent Scholarship: History of Medicine and Islamic Law

Earlier this month, the Egyptian online newspaper Mada Masr published a detailed and richly illustrated interview with Khaled Fahmy (University of Cambridge) discussing his recent book, In Quest of Justice: Islamic Law and Forensic Medicine in Modern Egypt (UC Press, 2018). Excerpt: Focusing on changes in medicine and law in the 19th century and their … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: History of Medicine and Islamic Law

Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal: June 14th

This week’s issue of the Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal includes: "The Limits of Liberal Inclusivity: How Defining Islamophobia Normalises Anti-Muslim Racism" by Rebecca Ruth Gould This paper (forthcoming in the Journal of Law and Religion) responds to recent calls made within the UK Parliament for a government-backed definition of Islamophobia. … Continue reading Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal: June 14th

Recap on Islamic Law at the 2019 Law & Society Association Annual Meeting

The Islamic Law and Society Collaborative Research Network (ILS-CRN) met at this year’s Law & Society Association Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, co-chaired by Professors Intisar Rabb (Harvard) and Tamir Moustafa (Simon Fraser). This year, over twenty people presented papers, author-meet-reader panels, or other presentations on Islamic law and society. Most also joined the business meeting to discuss exciting … Continue reading Recap on Islamic Law at the 2019 Law & Society Association Annual Meeting

Opportunity :: Wallace Johnson First Book Program

The Wallace Johnson Program for First Book Authors, sponsored by the American Society for Legal History (ASLH), is designed to provide advice and support to scholars working toward the publication of first books in legal history, broadly defined. In conversation with peers and with the advice of senior scholars, participants will learn about approaching and … Continue reading Opportunity :: Wallace Johnson First Book Program

Recent Scholarship: Khalilieh on Islamic Law of the Sea

Islamic Law of the Sea: Freedom of Navigation and Passage Rights in Islamic Thought "The doctrine of modern law of the sea is commonly believed to have developed from Renaissance Europe. Often ignored though is the role of Islamic law of the sea and customary practices at that time. In this book, Hassan S. Khalilieh … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Khalilieh on Islamic Law of the Sea

Recent Scholarship: Medieval Islamic Legal Debates

In the latest issue of Studia Islamica, Asma Afsaruddin’s article on “Jihād, Gender, and Religious Minorities in the Siyar Literature: The Diachronic View” compares five medieval works to highlight changing attitudes towards the participation of non-Muslims and women in military jihād. Meanwhile, Omar Farahat’s new book on The Foundation of Norms of Islamic Jurisprudence and … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Medieval Islamic Legal Debates

Recent Scholarship: European Muslims and Islamic Law

Two recent journal articles explore how Islamic law is being defined, debated, and applied in Europe – both by Muslims and by courts. Maurits S. Berger’s “Understanding Sharia in the West” in the Journal of Law, Religion and State discusses three different "representations" of sharīʿa: “as scholarship, as a set of rules inserted into the modern … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: European Muslims and Islamic Law

Schmidtke on the Islamic Manuscript Tradition

In this video, Sabine Schmidtke, Professor of Islamic Intellectual History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, sounds the call for work on the Islamic manuscript tradition, which is uncounted and endangered – thus in need of identification, preservation, and digitization to ensure manuscripts are well-maintained and accessible. As Schmidtke explains: For scholars of … Continue reading Schmidtke on the Islamic Manuscript Tradition