In the News: Islamic Banks and FinTech

Last month, a representative of the Malaysian Industry-Government Group for High Technology—a public-private taskforce overseen by the prime minister to examine ways of using new technology to promote business opportunities—suggested that Islamic banks could reduce legal and administrative costs by using "blockchain." Blockchain is a type of electronic ledger, and according to the representative, blockchain … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Banks and FinTech

SHARIAsource Senior Scholars’ Round Up: Sept 10th

Last week, SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Mohammad Fadel was a panelist at an Atlantic Center event on “Rethinking Human Rights and Islam.” In addition, SHARIAsource Egypt and Malaysia Editor Tamir Moustafa has written a new book—Constituting Religion: Islam, Liberal Rights, and the Malaysian State—which can be downloaded here from Cambridge University Press.

Recent Scholarship: Fadel and Johnson on Constitutionalism

This forthcoming article by SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Mohammad Fadel is due to be published in an upcoming special issue of the International Journal of Constitutional Law. It describes how the development of laws in Egypt through a “deliberative political process” has been negatively impacted by the country’s top court: “The Sounds of Silence: The Supreme … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Fadel and Johnson on Constitutionalism

Syllabus: Islamic Business Law

The Islamic Law Teaching Project houses collections of syllabi and other teaching material for Islamic law courses taught primarily in law schools of the US and UK. This syllabus is from Professor Mohammad Fadel at New York University, School of Law. This course will provide an overview of the theoretical doctrines that give rise to Islamic finance … Continue reading Syllabus: Islamic Business Law

Commentary: Religious Opinions within Civil Discourse

By Professor Mohammad Fadel (University of Toronto, Faculty of Law) In a recent attempt to control religious discourse in Egypt, the chairperson of Egypt’s Supreme Media Regulatory Council (al-majlis al-aʿlā li-tanẓīm al-iʿlām), Makram Muhammad Ahmad, announced that only 50 people would be permitted to give an opinion (fatwā) pertaining to Islamic law. According to various … Continue reading Commentary: Religious Opinions within Civil Discourse