In the News: LGBT Rights in Malaysia

Last week, the news from Malaysia that two women were convicted of same-sex relations and were publicly caned in front of a large crowd prompted international condemnation. The decision was handed down by a sharīʿa court in the state of Terengganu. Under Malaysia’s Constitution, there are two parallel justice systems: the civil/criminal court system that … Continue reading In the News: LGBT Rights in Malaysia

SHARIAsource Editors and Senior Scholars’ Round Up: Aug 20th

SHARIAsource Early Abbasid Iraq and Iran Editor Nahed Samour moderated a discussion at the Jewish Museum in Berlin on tolerance of criticism in Judaism and Islam. Meanwhile, an op-ed in The Indian Express on the public debate in India over whether sharīʿa councils should be banned referenced SHARIAsource Southeast Asia and Pakistan Editor Jeff Redding’s … Continue reading SHARIAsource Editors and Senior Scholars’ Round Up: Aug 20th

Recent Scholarship: Redding on Transgender Rights in Pakistan

SHARIAsource South Asia editor Jeff Redding has written a paper on Muslim discussions on gender, law, and society discussing the rights of transgender people living in Pakistan, which constitutionally incorporates Islamic law into its state law system. The paper is due to appear as a book chapter in an edited volume called Human Rights in Translation: Intercultural … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Redding on Transgender Rights in Pakistan

Commentary: Vishwa Lochan Madan v. Union of India (2014) and the Uncertain Boundaries of Muslim Personal Law in India

This commentary, by SHARIAsource Southeast Asia editor Jeff Redding, explains crucial aspects of the 2014 Indian Supreme Court decision in Vishwa Lochan Madan v. Union of India, arguing that this highly-anticipated and long-delayed opinion left much unresolved about whether non-state Muslim legal actors have a role, along with state courts, in announcing and enforcing Muslim Personal … Continue reading Commentary: Vishwa Lochan Madan v. Union of India (2014) and the Uncertain Boundaries of Muslim Personal Law in India

Round-up on Triple Ṭalāq

SUPREME COURT CASE: Shayara Bano v. Union of India, etc. (Supreme Court of India)  In a 3-2 decision, the Supreme Court of India declared triple ṭalāq unconstitutional and gave India’s parliament six months “to consider legislation” for handling triple ṭalāq. In its opinion, the Court cited global advances in Islamic family law (in India, called Muslim … Continue reading Round-up on Triple Ṭalāq