In the News: SHARIAsource Blog

The latest issue of Harvard Law Bulletin, which came out last week, included an article on “Law’s Influencers” featuring blogs led by HLS faculty. The piece features SHARIAsource Blog! Professor Intisar Rabb says that her desire to share diverse viewpoints was a key reason she launched SHARIAsource, a blog she describes as “a SCOTUSblog for … Continue reading In the News: SHARIAsource Blog

In the News: Female Sharīʿa Court Judges

At the end of last year, the BBC compiled a list of “100 inspiring and influential women from around the world.” One of those women was Nenney Shushaidah, who made international headlines in 2016 after she and her colleague became Malaysia’s first female sharīʿa high court judges. In an interview with the BBC, Judge Shushaidah … Continue reading In the News: Female Sharīʿa Court Judges

European Court of Human Rights Rules Against Forcing Greek Muslim Minority to Follow Islamic Law

Last week, the European Court of Human Rights (which examines alleged violations of the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights) handed down its long-anticipated decision in Molla Sali v. Greece, a case about Islamic legal pluralism in Europe and the rights of religious minorities. Stay tuned to the SHARIAsourceBlog for a roundtable discussion on this … Continue reading European Court of Human Rights Rules Against Forcing Greek Muslim Minority to Follow Islamic Law

In the News: Ḥalāl Food

A few weeks ago, Germany's Interior Ministry apologized after serving pork at a conference on Islam in Berlin. Most of the attendees at the conference were apparently Muslim, and under Islamic law, pork is not considered permissible (ḥalāl) to eat. Like other aspects of Islamic law, there are some differences among Islamic legal scholars (and … Continue reading In the News: Ḥalāl Food

In the News: Triple Ṭalāq Criminalized in India

About three months ago, the Indian government formally criminalized “triple ṭalāq” divorce—an instant and irrevocable divorce under some versions of Islamic law where a husband can unilaterally divorce his wife by saying the word ṭalāq (divorce) three times. The Supreme Court of India had ruled last August that the practice of “triple ṭalāq” was unconstitutional. … Continue reading In the News: Triple Ṭalāq Criminalized in India

In the News: Islamic Burial Traditions

SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Mohammad Fadel recently wrote an article in the Middle East Eye reflecting on current events in Turkey and Saudi Arabia, and the historical significance of violating someone’s right to a proper burial. “In Islamic law,” Fadel explains, “burying the dead is a collective obligation—an obligation that falls on the entire community of … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Burial Traditions

In the News: Child Custody in Islamic Law

Last month, the ex-daughter-in-law of former Nigerian president Ibrahim Babangida took to Instagram to share her frustration with how the court was handling her child custody case, accusing the judge of having “changed the sharia law to fit his client” (her politically prominent ex-husband). Child custody, like other aspects of law, varies between countries—even in … Continue reading In the News: Child Custody in Islamic Law

In the News: Religious Conversions and Name Changes

This past year, there have been several celebrities and public figures who have announced that they have converted to Islam. As a personal choice, some people who convert also adopt an Arabic name, since Arabic is considered the sacred language of the Qurʾān and many political and religious leaders throughout Islamic history have also had … Continue reading In the News: Religious Conversions and Name Changes

In the News: Islamic Veils in France

Two weeks ago, the UN Human Rights Committee (which oversees compliance with the 1966 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights) declared that France’s ban on full-face veils violates freedom of religion. According to the 2010 French law, “No one may, in a public space, wear any article of clothing intended to conceal the face.” … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Veils in France

In the News: Paternity Lawsuits and DNA Testing in Egypt

Last month, Equal Times (a Brussels-based news site) published an article discussing the increase in paternity lawsuits and calls for DNA testing in Egypt. The Egyptian government estimates there are 75,000 paternity cases that are slowly making their way through the family court system. According to the article, the judges in these paternity cases have … Continue reading In the News: Paternity Lawsuits and DNA Testing in Egypt