In the News: Interfaith Marriages and Islamic Law in Tunisia

Last fall, Tunisia overturned a 1973 law that banned Muslim women from marrying non-Muslim men. (It is generally accepted by Islamic scholars that men are permitted to marry women of certain monotheistic faiths that predate Islam, such as Judaism and Christianity; however, the opposite scenario—Muslim women marrying non-Muslim men—is a source of contention.) Supporters of … Continue reading In the News: Interfaith Marriages and Islamic Law in Tunisia

In the News: Islamic Banks and FinTech

Last month, a representative of the Malaysian Industry-Government Group for High Technology—a public-private taskforce overseen by the prime minister to examine ways of using new technology to promote business opportunities—suggested that Islamic banks could reduce legal and administrative costs by using "blockchain." Blockchain is a type of electronic ledger, and according to the representative, blockchain … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Banks and FinTech

In the News: Muslim Marriages in South Africa

On August 31st, a South African court ruled that Islamic law marriages must be recognized by the government in order to provide greater protections to women and children in case of divorce. Currently in South Africa, the law recognizes “customary marriages,” but only when they are part of the “customs and usages traditionally observed among … Continue reading In the News: Muslim Marriages in South Africa

In the News: Prisoners’ Rights

Earlier this month, a Muslim civil rights groups raised concerns about the mistreatment and harassment of a Muslim woman inmate in Kansas. According to Muslim Advocates, correctional officers referred to her ḥijāb headscarf (which had been given to her by the prison chaplain) as a “rag” and as “contraband,” and ordered her to remove it … Continue reading In the News: Prisoners’ Rights

In the News: Islam in China

Last month, thousands of Hui Chinese Muslims gathered for a rare protest against the planned demolition of a mosque. The local authorities claimed that the mosque was bigger than was initially approved, and therefore, eight of its nine domes would be torn down. Up to 30,000 people attend prayers at the mosque. The government's decision … Continue reading In the News: Islam in China

In the News: Headscarves

Last month, the legal and political debate in Europe over Muslim headscarves was reignited after Denmark began implementing a ban on wearing burqas in public, and former UK foreign minister Boris Johnson said that women who wear burqas look like “letter boxes” and “bank robbers.” In the US, the headscarf has been debated by courts … Continue reading In the News: Headscarves

In the News: Islamic Inheritance Laws

Earlier this month, Tunisia’s President announced in a speech: “I propose equality inheritance to become law.” Currently in Tunisia, men typically inherit double what women inherit. The proposed change has attracted criticism from conservative Muslim groups, who argue that inheritance should be based on the Qurʾān—even though, according to Tunisia’s 2014 Constitution, Islamic law has … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Inheritance Laws

Case Commentary: Recognition of Islamic Marriage in the UK

A UK family court considered whether and how UK law recognizes a marriage conducted according to Islamic law that had not been accompanied by a civil law marriage. The husband contended that the couple was never married, and the wife—petitioning for divorce—insisted that they were. The two had signed an Islamic marriage contract (nikāḥ) accompanied … Continue reading Case Commentary: Recognition of Islamic Marriage in the UK

In the News: Muslim Marriages in the UK

Last week, an English High Court judge ruled in favor of a Muslim woman seeking a divorce from her husband, despite the fact that their marriage was never formally registered in the UK. The couple performed an Islamic nikāh ceremony 20 years ago, which recognized the marriage on religious terms. However, the judge found that … Continue reading In the News: Muslim Marriages in the UK

In The News: Blasphemy Laws in Pakistan

Islamic law was a prominent issue in last week’s elections in Pakistan. According to Reuters, religious parties were “fielding more than 1,500 candidates for national and provincial assemblies, compared with a few hundred in 2013.” The article describes a normalization of campaign rhetoric and slogans “accusing opponents of blasphemy or treason.” Imran Khan, who has … Continue reading In The News: Blasphemy Laws in Pakistan