Contemporary Primary Sources: Supreme Court of New South Wales: Mohamed v Mohamed [2012] NSWSC 852

The first defendant (Neima Mohamed, herein Neima), as the plaintiff in the court of first instance, had submitted that: On 4 April 2004, she and the plaintiff (Mostafa Mohamed, herein Mostafa) were married; On 28 February 2005, the parties had executed a pre-nuptial financial agreement that would regulate their financial affairs during and after their … Continue reading Contemporary Primary Sources: Supreme Court of New South Wales: Mohamed v Mohamed [2012] NSWSC 852

Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Islam v. Islam (N. Mar. I. Sup. Ct. 2009): State Recognition of Islamic Marriages and Divorces

At issue in this case is the validity of a marriage performed in the Islamic tradition, where the husband sought an annulment of an initial “traditional” marriage and recognition of a subsequent civil marriage. The law of the Philippines does not require a couple to obtain a marriage certificate if their marriage is performed according … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Islam v. Islam (N. Mar. I. Sup. Ct. 2009): State Recognition of Islamic Marriages and Divorces

Contemporary Primary Sources: Response of New Zealand Advertising Standards Complaints Board to Lux Body Wash Ad (1996)

A complaint to the New Zealand Advertising Standards Complaints Board about an arguably Orientalist depiction of a Western woman in an Islamic country for a Lux Body Wash ad. The ruling is of interest for its discussion about the depiction of religion and community standards in New Zealand (at the time) and the level of … Continue reading Contemporary Primary Sources: Response of New Zealand Advertising Standards Complaints Board to Lux Body Wash Ad (1996)

SYMPOSIUM :: On “The Independent Review into the application of Sharia law in England and Wales” by the UK Home Office

Response #1: Blurred Boundaries; Muddied Waters or Multiculturalism Gone Astray? Some reflections on The Independent Review into the application of Sharia law in England and Wales.[1] By Shaheen Sardar Ali Professor of Law, University of Warwick The Independent Review into the application of Sharia law in England and Wales[2] was presented to the UK Parliament … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM :: On “The Independent Review into the application of Sharia law in England and Wales” by the UK Home Office

Commentary: The Principle of Harmonious Interpretation and the Expansion of Federal Shariat Court Jurisdiction in Pakistan

By Noor Zafar This commentary explores the Pakistani Supreme Court's use of the principle of "harmonious interpretation" in order to expand the Federal Shariat Court's jurisdiction. In this post, I will examine a landmark case, Abdul Waheed v. Asma Jehangir, that was brought before the Pakistani Supreme Court and decided in 2004. The Court was … Continue reading Commentary: The Principle of Harmonious Interpretation and the Expansion of Federal Shariat Court Jurisdiction in Pakistan

Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: In re: The Marriage of Awatef and Nabil Dajani (Cal. Ct. App. 1988): Divorce Proceeding

In a divorce proceeding involving a prenuptial agreement (Islamic marriage contract) between a Muslim husband and wife, the California Court of Appeals considered the validity of a provision requiring the husband to pay 3,000 Jordanian dinars as well as 2,000 dinars of either cash or household furniture as a “deferred dowry” (known as mahr or … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: In re: The Marriage of Awatef and Nabil Dajani (Cal. Ct. App. 1988): Divorce Proceeding

Commentary: Codifying Polygamy in the 1957 Moroccan Mudawwana

In this commentary, SHARIAsource contributor Ari Schriber discusses Morocco's 1957 Personal Status Code, the country's first unified set of family law statutes. He address the provisions concerning polygamy in particular, and the government's attempts to evoke an Islamic basis for legalizing polygamy while simultaneously appearing to limit it in the name of protecting women. Read … Continue reading Commentary: Codifying Polygamy in the 1957 Moroccan Mudawwana

The Late Ottoman Empire and Egypt: Hybridity, Law, and Gender

Elizabeth H. Shlala, Visiting Scholar, Center for Middle Eastern Studies  April 4, 2017 |12:30 to 2:00 pm | CMES, Rm 102, 38 Kirkland St Cambridge, MA 02138 Elizabeth H. Shlala earned a PhD in History from Georgetown University. She has held academic positions at London School of Economics and Political Science, Oxford University, Columbia University, Georgetown University, … Continue reading The Late Ottoman Empire and Egypt: Hybridity, Law, and Gender

NY Court Ruling Against a Muslim Man’s Attempt to Unilaterally Divorce His Wife

Abed Awad, U.S. Editor, summarizes one of his recent cases on family law in which the defendant claims his maʿzūn-authenticated ṭalāq defers judgment of the divorce to the Family Court in Egypt. A revocable ṭalāq is not a final divorce to defeat a pending New York divorce action, said the New York Apellate Division The story of Fouad v. … Continue reading NY Court Ruling Against a Muslim Man’s Attempt to Unilaterally Divorce His Wife

Women’s Right to Divorce under Islamic Law in Pakistan and India

Indian Muslim women's rights are once again manifesting as debates about talaq (divorce). Shayara Bano, who holds an advanced degree in sociology, petitioned the Indian Supreme Court last year to rule on the constitutionalism of triple-ṭalāq, in which a Muslim husband may divorce his wife by simply saying "ṭalāq" three times with our without her consent. After she suffered … Continue reading Women’s Right to Divorce under Islamic Law in Pakistan and India