Islamic Law Scholars’ Round-Up: Apr 22nd

Joseph Lowry, Associate Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, was interviewed last month by FactCheck.org regarding a viral Facebook post which showed U.S. Congresswoman Ilhan Omar alongside distorted quotations from the Qurʾān. Lowry explained how "some of the interpretations given in the meme are mistranslated, and all of them are … Continue reading Islamic Law Scholars’ Round-Up: Apr 22nd

In the News: Prison Chaplains

Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court allowed Alabama to execute a Muslim inmate who had filed a legal challenge after prison officials told him he could only have a Christian chaplain present in the execution chamber—but not a Muslim imam. Domineque Ray’s lawyers had argued that the prison’s policy violated the Establishment Clause of the … Continue reading In the News: Prison Chaplains

In the News: Ḥalāl Food

A few weeks ago, Germany's Interior Ministry apologized after serving pork at a conference on Islam in Berlin. Most of the attendees at the conference were apparently Muslim, and under Islamic law, pork is not considered permissible (ḥalāl) to eat. Like other aspects of Islamic law, there are some differences among Islamic legal scholars (and … Continue reading In the News: Ḥalāl Food

In the News: Child Custody in Islamic Law

Last month, the ex-daughter-in-law of former Nigerian president Ibrahim Babangida took to Instagram to share her frustration with how the court was handling her child custody case, accusing the judge of having “changed the sharia law to fit his client” (her politically prominent ex-husband). Child custody, like other aspects of law, varies between countries—even in … Continue reading In the News: Child Custody in Islamic Law

In the News: Religious Conversions and Name Changes

This past year, there have been several celebrities and public figures who have announced that they have converted to Islam. As a personal choice, some people who convert also adopt an Arabic name, since Arabic is considered the sacred language of the Qurʾān and many political and religious leaders throughout Islamic history have also had … Continue reading In the News: Religious Conversions and Name Changes

Islamic Law Scholars’ Round Up: Nov 12th

Last week, US constitutional law professor and SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Asifa Quraishi-Landes wrote about the midterm elections, asking whether Muslim American voters should be guided by sharīʿa or the public good, or both. Quraishi-Landes was also one of the “thought leaders and change-makers” who was invited to speak at the 2018 Muslim Public Affairs Council … Continue reading Islamic Law Scholars’ Round Up: Nov 12th

In the News: Headscarves

Last month, the legal and political debate in Europe over Muslim headscarves was reignited after Denmark began implementing a ban on wearing burqas in public, and former UK foreign minister Boris Johnson said that women who wear burqas look like “letter boxes” and “bank robbers.” In the US, the headscarf has been debated by courts … Continue reading In the News: Headscarves

In the News: Muslim Marriages in the UK

Last week, an English High Court judge ruled in favor of a Muslim woman seeking a divorce from her husband, despite the fact that their marriage was never formally registered in the UK. The couple performed an Islamic nikāh ceremony 20 years ago, which recognized the marriage on religious terms. However, the judge found that … Continue reading In the News: Muslim Marriages in the UK

Islamic Law in SCOTUS

Senior Scholar Noah Feldman commented yesterday in Bloomberg News on the U.S. Supreme Court “travel ban” case, Trump v. Hawaii, calling the Court’s 5-4 decision to uphold the Executive Order restricting immigration to the U.S. of citizens from seven countries—most of which are predominantly Muslim—"a decision that will live in infamy." He had previously suggested … Continue reading Islamic Law in SCOTUS

Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: In re: The Marriage of Ahmad & Shaifia Shaban (Cal. Ct. App. 2001): Marriage Certificate as Prenup

The appellate court upheld the Superior Court of Orange County’s refusal to divide marital property in the context of a divorce according to Islamic law. The plaintiff introduced a marriage certificate as a “premarital contract,” which, among other things, lays out a set amount to be paid to the wife in the event of a divorce. … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: In re: The Marriage of Ahmad & Shaifia Shaban (Cal. Ct. App. 2001): Marriage Certificate as Prenup