FEATURE :: Roundtable on Islamic Family Law in the UK: Akhter v. Khan (July 2018)

Six scholars and practitioners of Islamic family law and related subjects weigh in on the recent high-profile case of Islamic divorce in the UK, Akhter v. Khan issued by the High Court of Justice of England and Wales.  At the tail end of last month, a UK court decided a case of family law that has reverberated … Continue reading FEATURE :: Roundtable on Islamic Family Law in the UK: Akhter v. Khan (July 2018)

SYMPOSIUM :: On “The Independent Review into the application of Sharia law in England and Wales” by the UK Home Office

Response #1: Blurred Boundaries; Muddied Waters or Multiculturalism Gone Astray? Some reflections on The Independent Review into the application of Sharia law in England and Wales.[1] By Shaheen Sardar Ali Professor of Law, University of Warwick The Independent Review into the application of Sharia law in England and Wales[2] was presented to the UK Parliament … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM :: On “The Independent Review into the application of Sharia law in England and Wales” by the UK Home Office

SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims”: Interview with Man Ke (Post 5 of 5)

China editor Matthew Erie‘s introduction and summary. For further details, see Erie's opening post here.: Man Ke (满珂), a female professor at the Northwest Nationalities University, provides yet another perspective based on both her disciplinary background (anthropology) and her location (Lanzhou). In her untitled piece, Man Ke explains that the different “teaching schools” (jiaopai) and … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims”: Interview with Man Ke (Post 5 of 5)

SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Interview with Liu Xueqiang (Post 4 of 5)

China editor Matthew Erie's introduction and summary. For further details, see Erie's opening post here.: Liu Xueqiang (刘学强), a male cleric based in Kaifeng City in Henan Province, writes in his commentary “Islam’s Gender Relations,” that the phenomenon of female clerics originates in the particular historical-cultural environs of the Central Plains of China (i.e., present … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Interview with Liu Xueqiang (Post 4 of 5)

SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims:” Interview with Ge Caixia (Post 3 of 5)

China editor Matthew Erie's introduction and summary. For further details, see Erie's opening post here.: Ge Caixia (葛彩霞), the female cleric of Fuminli Female Mosque in Zhengzhou and who received her educated both at Arabic schools and at female mosques, opines in her piece “The Legal and Social Bases for the Existence of China’s ‘Female … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims:” Interview with Ge Caixia (Post 3 of 5)

SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Interview with Mai Fenlian (Post 2 of 5)

China editor Matthew Erie's introduction and summary. For further details, see Erie's opening post here.: Mai Fenlian (买粉连), a former cleric who was educated in a female mosque and currently an Arabic instructor at the Xiajia Arabic class in Jiyuan City in Henan Province writes in her commentary “The Legal Basis and Value of the … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Interview with Mai Fenlian (Post 2 of 5)

SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Editor’s Introduction (Post 1 of 5)

An online symposium hosted by SHARIAsource, Islamic Legal Studies Program of Harvard Law School Edited by Matthew S. Erie, China Editor of SHARIAsource and Associate Professor at the University of Oxford One of the outstanding features of Islam in China is the presence of Chinese Muslim (Hui) female clerics (nü ahong). Women have attained the position … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Editor’s Introduction (Post 1 of 5)