In the News: Sri Lanka’s Emergency Law

A ban on face coverings in Sri Lanka following the Easter Sunday attacks has once again highlighted the issue of restrictions on religious freedoms in response to public safety concerns. According to the ban: No person shall wear in any public place any garment, clothing or such other material concealing the full face which will … Continue reading In the News: Sri Lanka’s Emergency Law

Islamic Law Scholars’ Round-Up: Apr 8

Last month, Asifa Quraishi-Landes and Nadia B. Ahmad published an article in the Washington Post discussing five common misconceptions about the ḥijāb. In addition, Zubair Abassi was quoted in an Al Jazeera article on the experiences of Pakistani women seeking divorces in the country’s family courts. (See also Abbasi’s 2017 SHARIAsource commentary comparing women’s right … Continue reading Islamic Law Scholars’ Round-Up: Apr 8

Recent Scholarship: Fadel on Islamic Self-Government

SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Mohammad Fadel has written an article in the most recent issue of the Journal of Islamic Ethics (available open-access here), discussing how states can incorporate sharīʿa into their legislative systems in a way consistent with our modern-day ideals of democracy and peace: “Political Legitimacy, Democracy and Islamic Law: The Place of Self‐Government … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Fadel on Islamic Self-Government

Recent Scholarship: “Burkinis” in Belgium

In this article from the Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights, Eva Brems, Saïla Ouald Chaib, and Katrijn Vanhees discuss the status of the "burkini" (body covering swimwear) under Belgian law and policy. "'Burkini' Bans in Belgian Municipal Swimming Pools: Banning As a Default Option" Following the French commotion on the presence of “burkini” wearers at … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: “Burkinis” in Belgium

In the News: Islamic Veils in France

Two weeks ago, the UN Human Rights Committee (which oversees compliance with the 1966 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights) declared that France’s ban on full-face veils violates freedom of religion. According to the 2010 French law, “No one may, in a public space, wear any article of clothing intended to conceal the face.” … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Veils in France

In the News: Prisoners’ Rights

Earlier this month, a Muslim civil rights groups raised concerns about the mistreatment and harassment of a Muslim woman inmate in Kansas. According to Muslim Advocates, correctional officers referred to her ḥijāb headscarf (which had been given to her by the prison chaplain) as a “rag” and as “contraband,” and ordered her to remove it … Continue reading In the News: Prisoners’ Rights

In the News: Headscarves

Last month, the legal and political debate in Europe over Muslim headscarves was reignited after Denmark began implementing a ban on wearing burqas in public, and former UK foreign minister Boris Johnson said that women who wear burqas look like “letter boxes” and “bank robbers.” In the US, the headscarf has been debated by courts … Continue reading In the News: Headscarves

Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Amicus Brief filed by Fifteen Religious and Civil Rights Organizations in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch, 575 U.S. __ (2015)

This brief, submitted by fifteen religious and civil rights organizations, addresses the notion that numerous conflicts often arise between job duties and religious convictions in areas of ritual law, including Sabbaths and other holy days, dietary restrictions, and dress for many Jews, Muslims, Christians and members of other faiths. These organizations point out that the … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Amicus Brief filed by Fifteen Religious and Civil Rights Organizations in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch, 575 U.S. __ (2015)

Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Webb v. City of Philadelphia (3d Cir. 2009): Ḥijāb with Police Uniform

A female Muslim police officer, Kimberlie Webb, sued the City of Philadelphia under Title VII and the Pennsylvania Religious Freedom Protection Act, alleging religion- and gender-based discrimination. Specifically, the plaintiff objected to the City barring her from wearing a headscarf (ḥijāb) with her police uniform, and argued that the prohibition amounted to a failure to … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Webb v. City of Philadelphia (3d Cir. 2009): Ḥijāb with Police Uniform

Contemporary Primary Sources: Press Release on Court of Justice of the European Union’s Ruling on Religious and Political Symbols in the Workplace

Two Muslim women who were prohibited by their respective employers from wearing a ḥijāb sued their employers on the grounds of religious discrimination. The Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) decided whether these women had been unfairly dismissed by their respective employers when taking into account the 2000 EU directive on discrimination in the workplace. The ECJ ruled that … Continue reading Contemporary Primary Sources: Press Release on Court of Justice of the European Union’s Ruling on Religious and Political Symbols in the Workplace