Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Webb v. City of Philadelphia (3d Cir. 2009): Ḥijāb with Police Uniform

A female Muslim police officer, Kimberlie Webb, sued the City of Philadelphia under Title VII and the Pennsylvania Religious Freedom Protection Act, alleging religion- and gender-based discrimination. Specifically, the plaintiff objected to the City barring her from wearing a headscarf (ḥijāb) with her police uniform, and argued that the prohibition amounted to a failure to … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Webb v. City of Philadelphia (3d Cir. 2009): Ḥijāb with Police Uniform

Amicus Brief filed by Fifteen Religious and Civil Rights Organizations in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch, 575 U.S. _ (2015)

This brief, submitted by fifteen religious and civil rights organizations, addresses the notion that numerous conflicts often arise between job duties and religious convictions in areas of ritual law, including Sabbaths and other holy days, dietary restrictions, and dress for many Jews, Muslims, Christians and members of other faiths. These organizations point out that the … Continue reading Amicus Brief filed by Fifteen Religious and Civil Rights Organizations in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch, 575 U.S. _ (2015)

Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch, 575 U.S. _ (2015): “Ḥijāb Case”

Holding: To prevail in a disparate-treatment claim, an applicant need show only that his need for an accommodation was a motivating factor in the employer’s decision, not that the employer had knowledge of his need. Judgment: Reversed and remanded, 8-1, in an opinion by Justice Scalia on June 1, 2015. Justice Alito filed an opinion … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch, 575 U.S. _ (2015): “Ḥijāb Case”

Islamic Center of Nashville: Ijāra Financing Cancels Religious Tax Exemption for Financed Property

U.S. Editor Abed Awad examines the implications of the 6th Circuit's decision in September regarding the financing of an Islamic Center through ijāra. Case: Islamic Center of Nashville v. Tennessee, et al., 872 F.3d 377 (6th Cir. 2017)  Established in 1979, the Islamic Center of Nashville is a religious not-for-profit that operates both a mosque … Continue reading Islamic Center of Nashville: Ijāra Financing Cancels Religious Tax Exemption for Financed Property

Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Conway v. Purves (E.D. Mich. 2013): Calories in Prisoners’ Meals during Ramadan

We use real cases to show how U.S. Courts consider Islamic law. Like any other legal framework, Islamic law defines and dignifies the institutions people hold dear, including marriage and finance. What do American judges do when adjudicating a case in which at least one party primarily understands these institutions and their protections through Islamic … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Conway v. Purves (E.D. Mich. 2013): Calories in Prisoners’ Meals during Ramadan

Excerpt :: On Muslims’ agenda: Fight anti-Sharia proposals in US states

SHARIAsource editor Will Smiley shares in the Washington Post his expertise on the motives of new anti-sharia legislation in some states. Citation: Marcelo, Philip. "On Muslims’ agenda: Fight anti-Sharia proposals in US states." Washington Post, March 27, 2017, https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/religion/on-muslims-agenda-fight-us-proposals-to-ban-sharia-law/2017/03/27/430e4378-12fc-11e7-bb16-269934184168_story.html?utm_term=.42a6665938f4. “Sharia should be very concerning to all of us,” said state Rep. Heidi Sampson, a Maine Republican who has proposed … Continue reading Excerpt :: On Muslims’ agenda: Fight anti-Sharia proposals in US states

Excerpt: Naming a Baby Is Hard Enough Without the State Involved

Senior scholar Noah Feldman comments on First Amendment issues underlying the state of Georgia's refusal to allow a couple to give their child the last name Allah. Excerpted from the original piece on Bloomberg View. "The state of Georgia is refusing to allow a couple to give their baby the last name Allah -- not because it’s … Continue reading Excerpt: Naming a Baby Is Hard Enough Without the State Involved

Watts v. Byars (D.S.C. 2013): Religious Accommodations for Prisoners

The Plaintiff, Marcus Leeotis Watts, sued the Respondents, various prison officials at the Perry Correctional Institution in South Carolina, for allegedly violating his rights under RLUIPA and the First Amendment when the prison failed to provide Muslim prisoners with halal meat. The Respondents contended that the vegetarian meal option that complied with Islamic law was … Continue reading Watts v. Byars (D.S.C. 2013): Religious Accommodations for Prisoners

Legal History of Religious Accommodation and Muslim Prisoners

Bernard Freamon chronicles the legal history behind the recent case regarding religious accommodation of prisoners, Conway v. Purves. Four Muslim prisoners incarcerated in four prisons in the Michigan prison system just settled a federal lawsuit against prison officials. The lawsuit, Conway v. Purves, No. 13-cv-10271 (E.D. Michigan, 2017) alleged that the prisoners were denied sufficient nutrition when … Continue reading Legal History of Religious Accommodation and Muslim Prisoners

CASES TO WATCH (UPDATE):: Can a Judge Determine Acceptable Religious Attire in a Quebec, Canada Courtroom?

Guest contributor Jennifer Selby answered this two weeks ago in her earlier post on the Rania El-Alloul case in Quebec. There, she concluded that, "So, for the time being, yes, a Quebecois provincial judge can dictate religious attire in her courtroom. However, we must wait to see how El-Alloul’s case for clarification unfolds to see whether judges will continue to set these … Continue reading CASES TO WATCH (UPDATE):: Can a Judge Determine Acceptable Religious Attire in a Quebec, Canada Courtroom?