European Court of Human Rights Rules Against Forcing Greek Muslim Minority to Follow Islamic Law

Last week, the European Court of Human Rights (which examines alleged violations of the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights) handed down its long-anticipated decision in Molla Sali v. Greece, a case about Islamic legal pluralism in Europe and the rights of religious minorities. Stay tuned to the SHARIAsourceBlog for a roundtable discussion on this … Continue reading European Court of Human Rights Rules Against Forcing Greek Muslim Minority to Follow Islamic Law

Recent Scholarship: Fadel on Islamic Self-Government

SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Mohammad Fadel has written an article in the most recent issue of the Journal of Islamic Ethics (available open-access here), discussing how states can incorporate sharīʿa into their legislative systems in a way consistent with our modern-day ideals of democracy and peace: “Political Legitimacy, Democracy and Islamic Law: The Place of Self‐Government … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Fadel on Islamic Self-Government

In the News: Ḥalāl Food

A few weeks ago, Germany's Interior Ministry apologized after serving pork at a conference on Islam in Berlin. Most of the attendees at the conference were apparently Muslim, and under Islamic law, pork is not considered permissible (ḥalāl) to eat. Like other aspects of Islamic law, there are some differences among Islamic legal scholars (and … Continue reading In the News: Ḥalāl Food

In the News: Triple Ṭalāq Criminalized in India

About three months ago, the Indian government formally criminalized “triple ṭalāq” divorce—an instant and irrevocable divorce under some versions of Islamic law where a husband can unilaterally divorce his wife by saying the word ṭalāq (divorce) three times. The Supreme Court of India had ruled last August that the practice of “triple ṭalāq” was unconstitutional. … Continue reading In the News: Triple Ṭalāq Criminalized in India

Islamic Law Scholars’ Round Up: Nov 12th

Last week, US constitutional law professor and SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Asifa Quraishi-Landes wrote about the midterm elections, asking whether Muslim American voters should be guided by sharīʿa or the public good, or both. Quraishi-Landes was also one of the “thought leaders and change-makers” who was invited to speak at the 2018 Muslim Public Affairs Council … Continue reading Islamic Law Scholars’ Round Up: Nov 12th

In the News: Islamic Courts in Greek Thrace

Last month, National Geographic published a photo essay on a Muslim minority community (known as Pomaks) who live in northeastern Greece, in a small, remote region called Western Thrace. What makes this region unique is that it is the only place in the European Union that has Islamic courts that are recognized by the national … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Courts in Greek Thrace

Recent Scholarship: Journal Issue on Unregistered Marriages

An upcoming special issue of the Oxford Journal of Law and Religion focuses on unregistered Muslim marriages, which was also the topic of a recent SHARIAsource roundtable. The articles reiterate that one of the main challenges with unregistered marriages is that there are certain benefits and state protections that are only available to legally recognized … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Journal Issue on Unregistered Marriages

In the News: Islam in China

Last month, thousands of Hui Chinese Muslims gathered for a rare protest against the planned demolition of a mosque. The local authorities claimed that the mosque was bigger than was initially approved, and therefore, eight of its nine domes would be torn down. Up to 30,000 people attend prayers at the mosque. The government's decision … Continue reading In the News: Islam in China

Recent Scholarship: Registration of Muslim Marriages

Last week’s roundtable discussed the registration of Muslim marriages in modern-day UK. For a historical and comparative perspective, read this article in Islamic Law and Society—written by SHARIAsource Russia, Central Asia & Caucasus Editor Rozaliya Garipova—about the registration of Muslim marriages in nineteenth-century Russia. “Married or Not Married? On the Obligatory Registration of Muslim Marriages … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Registration of Muslim Marriages

Recent Scholarship: Roose on Multiculturalism

SHARIAsource Australia Editor Joshua Roose recently co-authored an article in The Sociological Review discussing how public perceptions of Islamic law have impacted the debate over Muslim immigration and multiculturalism in Australia. "The Limits of Multiculturalism in Australia? The Shari’a Flogging Case of R v. Raad, Fayed, Cifci and Coskun" This article examines a criminal case … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Roose on Multiculturalism