Federal Shariat Court of Pakistan on Surrogacy: From Judicial Islamization of Laws to Judicial Legislation

Pakistan editor Zubair Abbasi examines the legality of surrogacy under Islamic law. In Farooq Siddiqui v Mst. Farzana Naheed, decided on 16 February 2017, the Federal Shariat Court (FSC) determined the legality of surrogacy under Islamic law. In this case note, Abbasi analyzes the judgment of the FSC on surrogacy. Based on this analysis, he argues that this judgment signifies a historical … Continue reading Federal Shariat Court of Pakistan on Surrogacy: From Judicial Islamization of Laws to Judicial Legislation

The Treatment of Women: Applying Islamic Law in Greek Thrace

Greek expert Ilker Tsavousoglou (Ghent University) examines developments in Western Thrace, in Greece, to illustrate the complexities of modern legal pluralism where secular states have some jurisdiction for Islamic law. Greece recognizes an Islamic law jurisdiction in Thrace, whereby it accords muftī tribunals – muftīs being expert jurists who typically give advisory opinions in Islamic law – the authority to oversee and enforce Islamic law in the region. To some observers, this … Continue reading The Treatment of Women: Applying Islamic Law in Greek Thrace

The Dissolution of Sharīʿa in the 1965 Moroccan Court Unification Law

During a time when there are global questions about stable Muslim-majority states that have combined Islamic law with state law, SHARIAsource editor Ari Schriber (Harvard University) convincingly demonstrates that Morocco's 1965 Court Unification Law deserves more attention, though not for the reasons one may initially suppose. In asserting independence then, Moroccan leaders paved the way … Continue reading The Dissolution of Sharīʿa in the 1965 Moroccan Court Unification Law

SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims”: Interview with Man Ke (Post 5 of 5)

China editor Matthew Erie‘s introduction and summary. For further details, see Erie's opening post here.: Man Ke (满珂), a female professor at the Northwest Nationalities University, provides yet another perspective based on both her disciplinary background (anthropology) and her location (Lanzhou). In her untitled piece, Man Ke explains that the different “teaching schools” (jiaopai) and … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims”: Interview with Man Ke (Post 5 of 5)

SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Interview with Liu Xueqiang (Post 4 of 5)

China editor Matthew Erie's introduction and summary. For further details, see Erie's opening post here.: Liu Xueqiang (刘学强), a male cleric based in Kaifeng City in Henan Province, writes in his commentary “Islam’s Gender Relations,” that the phenomenon of female clerics originates in the particular historical-cultural environs of the Central Plains of China (i.e., present … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Interview with Liu Xueqiang (Post 4 of 5)

SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims:” Interview with Ge Caixia (Post 3 of 5)

China editor Matthew Erie's introduction and summary. For further details, see Erie's opening post here.: Ge Caixia (葛彩霞), the female cleric of Fuminli Female Mosque in Zhengzhou and who received her educated both at Arabic schools and at female mosques, opines in her piece “The Legal and Social Bases for the Existence of China’s ‘Female … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims:” Interview with Ge Caixia (Post 3 of 5)

SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Interview with Mai Fenlian (Post 2 of 5)

China editor Matthew Erie's introduction and summary. For further details, see Erie's opening post here.: Mai Fenlian (买粉连), a former cleric who was educated in a female mosque and currently an Arabic instructor at the Xiajia Arabic class in Jiyuan City in Henan Province writes in her commentary “The Legal Basis and Value of the … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Interview with Mai Fenlian (Post 2 of 5)

SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Editor’s Introduction (Post 1 of 5)

An online symposium hosted by SHARIAsource, Islamic Legal Studies Program of Harvard Law School Edited by Matthew S. Erie, China Editor of SHARIAsource and Associate Professor at the University of Oxford One of the outstanding features of Islam in China is the presence of Chinese Muslim (Hui) female clerics (nü ahong). Women have attained the position … Continue reading SYMPOSIUM: The Legal Basis for Female Clerics among Chinese Muslims: Editor’s Introduction (Post 1 of 5)