In the News: Triple Ṭalāq Criminalized in India

About three months ago, the Indian government formally criminalized “triple ṭalāq” divorce—an instant and irrevocable divorce under some versions of Islamic law where a husband can unilaterally divorce his wife by saying the word ṭalāq (divorce) three times. The Supreme Court of India had ruled last August that the practice of “triple ṭalāq” was unconstitutional. … Continue reading In the News: Triple Ṭalāq Criminalized in India

Islamic Law Scholars’ Round Up: Dec 10th

SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Khaled Abou El Fadl recently wrote an opinion piece in the New York Times on the political rhetoric of Saudi clerics. A recent conversation with Dr. Abou El Fadl about his book, Reasoning with God: Reclaiming Shari‘ah in the Modern Age, is also available here, where he discusses recent events in the … Continue reading Islamic Law Scholars’ Round Up: Dec 10th

In the News: Islamic Burial Traditions

SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Mohammad Fadel recently wrote an article in the Middle East Eye reflecting on current events in Turkey and Saudi Arabia, and the historical significance of violating someone’s right to a proper burial. “In Islamic law,” Fadel explains, “burying the dead is a collective obligation—an obligation that falls on the entire community of … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Burial Traditions

Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal: Nov 30th

This week’s issue of the Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal includes: "Security Design, Incentives, and Islamic Microfinance: Cross Country Evidence" by Yaoyao Fan, Kose John, Hong Liu, and Luqyan Tamanni This study finds that Sharia-compliant microfinance institutions have less credit risk than conventional ones, have better poverty outreach, are less likely … Continue reading Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal: Nov 30th

Recent Scholarship: Akhter v. Khan

In August, the SHARIAsourceBlog featured a roundtable discussion on the Akhter v. Khan case, concerning the legal status of Islamic marriages and divorces under UK law. The London School of Economics' "Religion and Global Society" blog also posted a commentary on the case, written by Alistair Jones, which questioned the role of the government in … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Akhter v. Khan

In the News: Paternity Lawsuits and DNA Testing in Egypt

Last month, Equal Times (a Brussels-based news site) published an article discussing the increase in paternity lawsuits and calls for DNA testing in Egypt. The Egyptian government estimates there are 75,000 paternity cases that are slowly making their way through the family court system. According to the article, the judges in these paternity cases have … Continue reading In the News: Paternity Lawsuits and DNA Testing in Egypt

Recent Scholarship: Cheema and Abbasi on Islamic Family Law in Pakistan

Shahbaz Ahmad Cheema and SHARIAsource South Asia Editor Zubair Abbasi have written a paper on the role of the 150-year-old Lahore High Court—which has jurisdiction over Pakistan’s most populous province of Punjab—in developing progressive Islamic family law in the country. "Contribution of the Lahore High Court in the Development of Islamic Family Law in Pakistan" … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Cheema and Abbasi on Islamic Family Law in Pakistan

In the News: Islamic Courts in Greek Thrace

Last month, National Geographic published a photo essay on a Muslim minority community (known as Pomaks) who live in northeastern Greece, in a small, remote region called Western Thrace. What makes this region unique is that it is the only place in the European Union that has Islamic courts that are recognized by the national … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Courts in Greek Thrace

Islamic Law Scholarship Round Up: Oct 19th

Ralph Grillo, who wrote for the SHARIAsourceBlog in March regarding “The Independent Review into the application of Sharia law in England and Wales” by the UK Home Office, just published an article in the Journal of Muslims in Europe on this ongoing legal and policy debate. In his article (“Comment on the Report of the … Continue reading Islamic Law Scholarship Round Up: Oct 19th

In the News: Interfaith Marriages and Islamic Law in Tunisia

Last fall, Tunisia overturned a 1973 law that banned Muslim women from marrying non-Muslim men. (It is generally accepted by Islamic scholars that men are permitted to marry women of certain monotheistic faiths that predate Islam, such as Judaism and Christianity; however, the opposite scenario—Muslim women marrying non-Muslim men—is a source of contention.) Supporters of … Continue reading In the News: Interfaith Marriages and Islamic Law in Tunisia