Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Anti-Sharīʿa Ban in Kansas

U.S. editor Abed Awad weighs in on the Kansas Superior Court's discussion of mahr and Kansas's anti-sharīʿa legislation in Soleimani v. Soleimani, 2012 WL 3729939 (Kansas Superior Court, 2012). Soleimani v. Soleimani, 2012 WL 3729939 (Kansas Superior Court, 2012) involved a wife’s request to enforce the mahr contained in her Muslim marriage contract. While the trial level … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Anti-Sharīʿa Ban in Kansas

NY Court Ruling Against a Muslim Man’s Attempt to Unilaterally Divorce His Wife

Abed Awad, U.S. Editor, summarizes one of his recent cases on family law in which the defendant claims his maʿzūn-authenticated ṭalāq defers judgment of the divorce to the Family Court in Egypt. A revocable ṭalāq is not a final divorce to defeat a pending New York divorce action, said the New York Apellate Division The story of Fouad v. … Continue reading NY Court Ruling Against a Muslim Man’s Attempt to Unilaterally Divorce His Wife

Islamic Law in US Courts: Aleem v. Aleem, 947 A.2d 489 (Md. Ct. App. 2008)

We use real cases to show how U.S. Courts consider Islamic law. Like any other legal framework, Islamic law defines and dignifies the institutions people hold dear, including marriage and finance. What do American judges do when adjudicating a case in which at least one party primarily understands these institutions and their protections through Islamic … Continue reading Islamic Law in US Courts: Aleem v. Aleem, 947 A.2d 489 (Md. Ct. App. 2008)

Women’s Right to Divorce under Islamic Law in Pakistan and India

Indian Muslim women's rights are once again manifesting as debates about talaq (divorce). Shayara Bano, who holds an advanced degree in sociology, petitioned the Indian Supreme Court last year to rule on the constitutionalism of triple-ṭalāq, in which a Muslim husband may divorce his wife by simply saying "ṭalāq" three times with our without her consent. After she suffered … Continue reading Women’s Right to Divorce under Islamic Law in Pakistan and India

The Danial Latifi Case and the Indian Supreme Court’s Balancing Act

Islamic law is before the Supreme Court of India again, with the question of whether triple-ṭalāq is a valid way of dissolving a marriage: by a man simply pronouncing that his wife is divorced by saying that word three times. To understand where the Court might be going requires a bit of background. Following the … Continue reading The Danial Latifi Case and the Indian Supreme Court’s Balancing Act

ELECTION DAY 2016 :: Civil Rights Sharīʿa and the Elections as a Part of the American Political Process

On election day 2016, Professor Intisar Rabb, SHARIAsource founding editor-in-chief, reflects on the notion of “civil rights sharīʿa”: the role that Islamic law has historically played in honoring and pressing for shared commitments to justice and equality under the law. Modern American history already exemplifies this notion in the legacy of boxing legend Muhammad Ali, who died as … Continue reading ELECTION DAY 2016 :: Civil Rights Sharīʿa and the Elections as a Part of the American Political Process

CASE COMMENT: Shamim Ara and the Divorce Politics of a Secular and Modern India

South Asia editor Jeff Redding argues that the "state vs. non-state character of talaq" is too often overlooked as a factor influencing the Indian Supreme Court's decision in the landmark case Shamim Ara v. State of U.P. (2002). While the decision's positive effect on Muslim women's welfare in India cannot be denied, the contemporary Indian state's concerns about presenting itself as a … Continue reading CASE COMMENT: Shamim Ara and the Divorce Politics of a Secular and Modern India