Commentary: Arbitrariness and the Burden of Proof in New Acehnese Cases of “Moral Crimes”

This post, by Waskito Jati, examines the litigation process and sentencing regime for a new type of moral crime in Aceh: khalwat (when an unmarried man and woman are secluded). This act is criminalized under the new Acehnese Islamic Criminal Law (Aceh Qanun Jinayat No. 6 of 2014). The classification of khalwat as a moral crime … Continue reading Commentary: Arbitrariness and the Burden of Proof in New Acehnese Cases of “Moral Crimes”

Does ISIS Really Follow the Salafī Version of Islamic Law and Theology?

Guest contributor Jacob Olidort critically examines ISIS's claim of adherence to the doctrine of Salafism, a popular orientation among conservative Muslim clerics who attempt to model their actions on a certain vision of law and theology in the early Muslim community. Himself a scholar of modern Salafī thought, Olidort concludes that ISIS's claims are at … Continue reading Does ISIS Really Follow the Salafī Version of Islamic Law and Theology?

The Construction and Failure of Islamic Laws of Evidence in ISIS’s State-Building Project

Guest contributor Mara Revkin outlines the legal infrastructure of ISIS. She argues that the movement's barbarism and apparently wanton acts of terrorism belies a self-contained legal system based on Islamic law – including the Islamic law of evidence. Using interviews with eighty-two Syrians and Iraqis, Revkin reconstructs how evidence is used within ISIS's purported borders. … Continue reading The Construction and Failure of Islamic Laws of Evidence in ISIS’s State-Building Project