Commentary: Religious Opinions within Civil Discourse

By Professor Mohammad Fadel (University of Toronto, Faculty of Law) In a recent attempt to control religious discourse in Egypt, the chairperson of Egypt’s Supreme Media Regulatory Council (al-majlis al-aʿlā li-tanẓīm al-iʿlām), Makram Muhammad Ahmad, announced that only 50 people would be permitted to give an opinion (fatwā) pertaining to Islamic law. According to various … Continue reading Commentary: Religious Opinions within Civil Discourse

In Response to the Indian Supreme Court’s Recent Decision on Triple Ṭalāq: A Legislative Proposal

The Indian Supreme Court's decision on triple ṭalāq declared it unconstitutional, and gave the legislature six months to decide on appropriate reform. Pakistan editor Zubair Abbasi responds to the decision and outlines considerations the legislature should address. "According to media reports, triple ṭalāq (instant, irrevocable divorce initiated by a husband in some versions of Islamic law) epitomizes … Continue reading In Response to the Indian Supreme Court’s Recent Decision on Triple Ṭalāq: A Legislative Proposal

Shayara Bano v. Union of India, etc. (Supreme Court of India): Judgment on Constitutionalism of Triple Ṭalāq

In a 3-2 decision, the Supreme Court of India declared triple ṭalāq unconstitutional and gave India’s parliament six months “to consider legislation” for handling triple ṭalāq. In its opinion, the Court cited global advances in Islamic family law (in India, called Muslim personal law) in “even theocratic Islamic states” as evidence of the need for reform.  The Court … Continue reading Shayara Bano v. Union of India, etc. (Supreme Court of India): Judgment on Constitutionalism of Triple Ṭalāq

Comparing the Religion-State Divide in the Arab World: Constitutions

Nathan Brown, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at the Elliot School of International Affairs at George Washington University, asserts that "Arab constitutions are not abnormally religious," even though they legally integrate religion in different ways. "Religion appears in the constitutions of the Arab world, almost all with Muslim majorities, in a variety of … Continue reading Comparing the Religion-State Divide in the Arab World: Constitutions

Excerpt :: On Muslims’ agenda: Fight anti-Sharia proposals in US states

SHARIAsource editor Will Smiley shares in the Washington Post his expertise on the motives of new anti-sharia legislation in some states. Citation: Marcelo, Philip. "On Muslims’ agenda: Fight anti-Sharia proposals in US states." Washington Post, March 27, 2017, https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/religion/on-muslims-agenda-fight-us-proposals-to-ban-sharia-law/2017/03/27/430e4378-12fc-11e7-bb16-269934184168_story.html?utm_term=.42a6665938f4. “Sharia should be very concerning to all of us,” said state Rep. Heidi Sampson, a Maine Republican who has proposed … Continue reading Excerpt :: On Muslims’ agenda: Fight anti-Sharia proposals in US states

Pakistan’s Federal Shariat Court and the Islamization of Prison Laws Judgment of 2009: Continued Expansion of Jurisdiction

Student editor Noor Zafar examines how the Federal Shariat Court of Pakistan expanded its jurisdiction through its interpretation of "injunctions of Islam." In the “Islamization of Prison Laws” judgment[1] of 2009, the Federal Shariat Court of Pakistan[2] (FSC) expands its original jurisdiction by broadly construing the term “injunctions of Islam.[3]” It construes the term to both … Continue reading Pakistan’s Federal Shariat Court and the Islamization of Prison Laws Judgment of 2009: Continued Expansion of Jurisdiction

Islamic Law in US Courts: Introduction

We use real cases to show how U.S. Courts consider Islamic law. Like any other legal framework, Islamic law defines and dignifies the institutions people hold dear, including marriage and finance. What do American judges do when adjudicating a case in which at least one party primarily understands these institutions and their protections through Islamic … Continue reading Islamic Law in US Courts: Introduction

Women’s Right to Divorce under Islamic Law in Pakistan and India

Indian Muslim women's rights are once again manifesting as debates about talaq (divorce). Shayara Bano, who holds an advanced degree in sociology, petitioned the Indian Supreme Court last year to rule on the constitutionalism of triple-ṭalāq, in which a Muslim husband may divorce his wife by simply saying "ṭalāq" three times with our without her consent. After she suffered … Continue reading Women’s Right to Divorce under Islamic Law in Pakistan and India

The Danial Latifi Case and the Indian Supreme Court’s Balancing Act

Islamic law is before the Supreme Court of India again, with the question of whether triple-ṭalāq is a valid way of dissolving a marriage: by a man simply pronouncing that his wife is divorced by saying that word three times. To understand where the Court might be going requires a bit of background. Following the … Continue reading The Danial Latifi Case and the Indian Supreme Court’s Balancing Act

IP in Islamic Law? Deriving Similar Patent Regimes from John Locke and the Qurʾān

When it comes to new technology and Islamic law, it turns out that the principles of Western intellectual property law are quite similar to Islamic property and contract law, according to Turkey editor Gizem Orbey. On her analysis, the latter permits the same applications as the former. Major sources of Islamic law are mum as to protecting … Continue reading IP in Islamic Law? Deriving Similar Patent Regimes from John Locke and the Qurʾān