Younger Scholars Forum in Comparative Law in Fukuoka, Japan

Due dates: Abstracts: September 15, 2017 The International Academy of Comparative Law will host the first-ever Younger Scholars Forum in Comparative Law, to be held in Fukuoka, Japan on Wednesday, July 25, 2018 as part of the larger quadrennial Congress of Comparative Law. "Younger scholars" are defined as those with no more than ten years … Continue reading Younger Scholars Forum in Comparative Law in Fukuoka, Japan

REVIEW:: Classical Islamic Law and Modern Bankruptcy (A Review of Abed Awad, “Classical Islamic Law and Modern Bankruptcy” (2010))

In their paper Classical Islamic Law and Modern Bankruptcy (2010), U.S. editor Abed Awad and his co-author Robert E. Michael compares bankruptcy in classical Islamic law to American bankruptcy pre and post the enactment of Chapter 11. Bankruptcy in classical Islamic law is "strongly analogous to the traditional civil and common law treatment of bankrupts prior to … Continue reading REVIEW:: Classical Islamic Law and Modern Bankruptcy (A Review of Abed Awad, “Classical Islamic Law and Modern Bankruptcy” (2010))

Is Sharīʿa Incompatible with the Modern Administrative State?

Anver Emon's (Professor of Law at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law and SHARIAsource senior scholar) new paper Codification and Islamic Law: The Ideology Behind a Tragic Narrative in the Journal of Middle East Law and Governance challenges the now popular argument that Islamic law is near-impossible to formalize as state law. Treating Islamic law … Continue reading Is Sharīʿa Incompatible with the Modern Administrative State?

Debt and Bankruptcy in Classical Islamic Law

Student editor Esther Agbaje (Harvard Law School) explores classical Islamic law's basic conceptions of debt and bankruptcy. While the main Islamic texts, the Qur’ān and Sunna (records of the Prophet Muhammad's teachings), provide principles for fiscal  matters, these principles are not enough to establish systems as complex as those in modern finance with a guarantee of soundness in … Continue reading Debt and Bankruptcy in Classical Islamic Law

REVIEW: Judges on Cushions and Under Trees: Thoughts on “Qāḍī Justice” and Hyperpolemics (A Review of Intisar Rabb, “Against Kadijustiz” (2015))

Guest contributor Haider Hamoudi reviews Professor Intisar Rabb's, SHARIAsource founding editor-in-chief, new article in the Suffolk Law Review entitled Against Kadijustiz: On the Negative Citation of Foreign Law. Rabb focuses on how American courts have utilized inaccurate portrayals of "qāḍī justice" as antitheses to American court procedures. Hamoudi notes that this point is all the more important when one … Continue reading REVIEW: Judges on Cushions and Under Trees: Thoughts on “Qāḍī Justice” and Hyperpolemics (A Review of Intisar Rabb, “Against Kadijustiz” (2015))

ELECTION DAY 2016 :: Civil Rights Sharīʿa and the Elections as a Part of the American Political Process

On election day 2016, Professor Intisar Rabb, SHARIAsource founding editor-in-chief, reflects on the notion of “civil rights sharīʿa”: the role that Islamic law has historically played in honoring and pressing for shared commitments to justice and equality under the law. Modern American history already exemplifies this notion in the legacy of boxing legend Muhammad Ali, who died as … Continue reading ELECTION DAY 2016 :: Civil Rights Sharīʿa and the Elections as a Part of the American Political Process

A Court by Any Other Name: State ‘Courts’ and Sharīʿa Councils

South Asia editor Jeff Redding compares the British sharīʿa courts debate to similar debates going on in India. He examines the semantic approach of the current debate, and questions whether this approach fully encompasses the issue. Controversies over non-state Islamic dispute resolution have flared around the globe in the last several years, in sites as diverse as Canada, India, and … Continue reading A Court by Any Other Name: State ‘Courts’ and Sharīʿa Councils

IP in Islamic Law? Deriving Similar Patent Regimes from John Locke and the Qurʾān

When it comes to new technology and Islamic law, it turns out that the principles of Western intellectual property law are quite similar to Islamic property and contract law, according to Turkey editor Gizem Orbey. On her analysis, the latter permits the same applications as the former. Major sources of Islamic law are mum as to protecting … Continue reading IP in Islamic Law? Deriving Similar Patent Regimes from John Locke and the Qurʾān