Recent Scholarship: Erie on Ḥalāl Food in China

Professor Matthew S. Erie (University of Oxford), an expert on Islamic law in China, just published an article in the Journal of Law and Religion on anti-sharīʿa sentiment in China and its impact on the ḥalāl food industry. "Shariʿa as Taboo of Modern Law: Halal Food, Islamophobia, and China" Abstract: Why is shariʿa the taboo … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Erie on Ḥalāl Food in China

In the News: Ḥalāl Meat

Two weeks ago, the European Court of Justice—the EU’s highest court—ruled that meat derived from animals that were not stunned before being slaughtered could not be labeled “organic.” The Court explained that the “organic” label was developed in response to consumers’ demand for food that protected animals’ welfare, and that scientific studies have shown that … Continue reading In the News: Ḥalāl Meat

In the News: Ḥalāl Food

A few weeks ago, Germany's Interior Ministry apologized after serving pork at a conference on Islam in Berlin. Most of the attendees at the conference were apparently Muslim, and under Islamic law, pork is not considered permissible (ḥalāl) to eat. Like other aspects of Islamic law, there are some differences among Islamic legal scholars (and … Continue reading In the News: Ḥalāl Food

Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Cloyd v. Dulin (M.D. Tenn. 2012): Religious Accommodations for Prisoners

Plaintiff Sturgeon Stewart, an inmate at the Kansas Department of Corrections (KDOC) brought suit against Respondents Vernestene Dulin, head of prison food services, and various other prison officials for alleged violations of his rights to religious free exercise on the claim that the prison served Muslim inmates the same ḥalāl food menu for all meals of … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Cloyd v. Dulin (M.D. Tenn. 2012): Religious Accommodations for Prisoners

Watts v. Byars (D.S.C. 2013): Religious Accommodations for Prisoners

The Plaintiff, Marcus Leeotis Watts, sued the Respondents, various prison officials at the Perry Correctional Institution in South Carolina, for allegedly violating his rights under RLUIPA and the First Amendment when the prison failed to provide Muslim prisoners with halal meat. The Respondents contended that the vegetarian meal option that complied with Islamic law was … Continue reading Watts v. Byars (D.S.C. 2013): Religious Accommodations for Prisoners

Legal Entrepreneurs in the Halal Industry: The Case of Sharīʿa in China

China editor Matthew S. Erie writes about how the Chinese government's attempts to legally respond to its Muslim Hui population's calls for greater regulation of halal food counters the original secular intentions of a socialist legal system. The law of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) allows for no legal basis for religious law, such as sharia. This bar, however, … Continue reading Legal Entrepreneurs in the Halal Industry: The Case of Sharīʿa in China